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IP Osgoode Speaks Series ft. Ryan Calo

Mar 30, 2017, 12:30PM-2PM

The term “sharing economy” refers to a set of techniques and practices that facilitate trusted transactions between strangers on digital platforms. The upsides of collaborative consumption are obvious to anyone who has hailed a ride at the touch of a button or found a room for a relative right down the block. The downsides are also coming into view. Critics argue that sharing economy firms perform an end run around labour laws and other regulations, and that participants in the sharing economy can face discrimination on the basis of race or disability.

This talk focuses on an increasingly important problem enjoying relatively little attention in the sharing economy literature: information asymmetry. Sharing economy firms, by virtue of sitting between the consumers and providers of services under the scaffolding of an app, can monitor and channel the behaviour of all. This confers upon sharing economy companies a remarkable degree of power. There are early but troubling signs that firms are learning to leverage this power to the determinant of other participants.

Ryan Calo is the Lane Powell and D. Wayne Gittinger Assistant Professor of Law at the University of Washington and the founding co-director of the UW Tech Policy Lab. His research on law and technology appears in leading American law reviews (University of Chicago Law Review, California Law Review) and scientific publications (Nature, Science), and he has advised a wide range of government institutions, including the German Parliament, the White House and the U.S. Senate.

A light lunch will be provided. RSVP by March 24 at iposgoode.ca/rsvp (event code: Calo). We look forward to welcoming you to this event.


Location:2027 Osgoode Hall Law School
Sponsor:IP Osgoode
Posted by:Michelle Li
Web Sitehttp://www.iposgoode.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/the-taking-economy-4.png
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